Language Tip of the Week

Language
by rebeccawinke | Thu, 07/30/2020 - 11:10
In a recent speech, Italy’s Health Minister Roberto Speranza shared his belief that the first half of 2020 has been the most difficult in the history of the…
Language
by rebeccawinke | Thu, 07/02/2020 - 05:58
Expressing a state of being is one of the most important and fundamental uses of language. How you are feeling in a specific moment (hungry, cold, sad) and…
Language
by Alesha Allen | Thu, 01/09/2020 - 16:13
A question my friends and I used to ask each other regularly when I lived in Italy was: what are you doing on Saturday evening? This would then spark a…
Language
by Alesha Allen | Fri, 01/03/2020 - 01:18
The new year is a great time to make some resolutions. What’s on your list for 2020?  I’d like to take some trips to Italy, spend more time with friends and…
Language
by Alesha Allen | Thu, 11/21/2019 - 10:40
When you start learning Italian, you’re taught that there are three conjugations to Italian verbs: -are, -ere and -ire. But have you ever come across any verbs…
Language
by Alesha Allen | Fri, 10/18/2019 - 03:37
Subject pronouns indicate the subject of a sentence, the person who is carrying out the verb. They take the place of nouns. You might refer to ‘my sister’ as ‘…
Language
by Alesha Allen | Thu, 10/10/2019 - 08:37
There are many types of pronouns in Italian, today we’re going to look at direct and indirect pronouns and how you can combine them. Let’s start with direct…
Language
by Alesha Allen | Thu, 07/04/2019 - 11:53
We only have one way to say ‘you’ in English. Italian has both a formal you ‘Lei’ and an informal you: ‘tu’. Which one should you use when? This is a question…
Language
by Alesha Allen | Fri, 03/29/2019 - 05:51
Introduction   Today’s language lesson is about how to use the passive form in Italian. There are two forms of verbs: passive and active. An active verb form…
Language
by Alesha Allen | Fri, 01/11/2019 - 02:38
I am sure you have heard the word ‘bellissimo’ (very beautiful) or ‘buonissimo’ (very good) in Italian. These -issimo endings are called absolute superlatives…